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Buffalo Bill State Park

Description:

Buffalo Bill State Park Site Description: Buffalo Bill State Park has two campgrounds, North Fork and North Shore. We also have nine developed Day Use areas, 9,000 acres of water recreation, and approximately 3,000 acres of park land. North Shore Bay Campground has 37 sites, an active day use area and a highly used boat ramp. North Shore generally has more visitor traffic. There is very little irrigated turf at North Shore but it does have a bubbler system for watering trees. There is no playground and is better suited for campers who are planning on boating or campers who plan on spending part of the day in town or touring the area. North Fork Campground has 62 campsites and a reservable group camp area. North Fork boasts a playground, shower facility with flush toilets, a large riparian area, abundant wildlife and a large irrigated turf area to recreate in. North Fork generally has less visitor traffic and is better suited for shore fishing and visitors who want to relax with a little more solitude.

Group picnic shelters are at Sheep Mountain and Bartlett Lane day use areas. Shreve Lodge provides a setting for group functions. Trout Creek Group Camping Area accommodates overnight use. Call Park Headquarters to reserve.

Fishing Licenses are available at Game & Fish Department offices or from local selling agents. Buffalo Bill Reservoir, excluding South Fork and Diamond Creek Dike Ponds in Park County. That portion lying west of a straight line connecting the mouths of Rattlesnake Creek and Sheep Creek (commonly known as Spring Creek) up the drainage to Gibbs Bridge is closed to fishing from April 1 through July 14. The creel limit on trout (excluding lake trout) shall be three (3) per day or in possession. No more than two (2) shall be cutthroat trout; and, no more than one (1) trout (excluding lake trout) shall exceed eighteen (18) inches. The creel limit on lake trout shall be six (6) per day or in possession. No more than one (1) lake trout shall exceed twenty four (24) inches. North Fork of the Shoshone River Drainage from Newton Creek downstream to Gibbs Bridge (including Newton Creek) in Park County. Closed to fishing from April 1 through June 30. North Fork of the Shoshone River Drainage upstream of Gibbs Bridge in Park County. The creel limit on trout shall be three (3) per day, or in possession. No more than two (2) shall be cutthroat trout; and, no more than one (1) trout shall exceed eighteen (18) inches.

Mountains dominate the scenery at Buffalo Bill State Park. Shoshone Canyon, where the dam is located, is framed by Rattlesnake Mountain to the north and Cedar Mountain (also known as Spirit Mountain) to the south. Farther west, along the north shoreline, lies Logan Mountain. The north and south forks of the Shoshone River are divided by Sheep Mountain, while prominent on the southern skyline is Carter Mountain. All are part of the Rocky Mountain Absaroka (Ab-Sor’-ka) Range. Elevations vary from approximately 5,400 feet in the state park to more than 12,000 feet in the Absarokas. .


History:

The history of Buffalo Bill Reservoir and “Cody Country” is rooted in the rich lore of the old West. Buffalo Bill State Park was named for Colonel William F. “Buffalo Bill” Cody, famous as a wild west showman, promoter and developer. He first came to the region in the 1870s as a guide for a survey expedition and spent the next 20 years guiding and sponsoring hunting parties in the area. “Buffalo Bill” Cody was influential in bringing irrigation and agricultural development into the area and founded the town in 1896 that bears his name. Some of the land now occupied by Buffalo Bill State Park was originally owned by Colonel Cody and was acquired from him by the federal government to implement the reservoir project. Work began on the dam in 1905. When completed in 1910, it was the highest dam in the world at 325 feet. Buffalo Bill State Park was established in 1957 and provided recreational areas and facilities along the original shoreline. In 1993, an eight-year project was completed that raised the crest of the dam 25 feet and increased the reservoir storage capacity. The enlarged reservoir inundated the former recreation areas and required removal of the old park facilities. Buffalo Bill State Park has been redeveloped as part of that project.

About Our Site - Buffalo Bill State Park

 

The history of Buffalo Bill Reservoir and “Cody Country” is rooted in the rich lore of the old West. Buffalo Bill State Park was named for Colonel William F. “Buffalo Bill” Cody, famous as a wild west showman, promoter and developer. He first came to the region in the 1870s as a guide for a survey expedition and spent the next 20 years guiding and sponsoring hunting parties in the area.

“Buffalo Bill” Cody was influential in bringing irrigation and agricultural development into the area and founded the town in 1896 that bears his name. Some of the land now occupied by Buffalo Bill State Park was originally owned by Colonel Cody and was acquired from him by the federal government to implement the reservoir project.

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Work began on the dam in 1905. When completed in 1910, it was the highest dam in the world at 325 feet. Buffalo Bill State Park was established in 1957 and provided recreational areas and facilities along the original shoreline. In 1993, an eight-year project was completed that raised the crest of the dam 25 feet and increased the reservoir storage capacity. The enlarged reservoir inundated the former recreation areas and required removal of the old park facilities. Buffalo Bill State Park has been redeveloped as part of that project.

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